FLORIDA INDOOR AIR QUALITY
You'll Breathe Easier With Us

THE ENEMY

The quality of our indoor air is constantly under attack from a variety of directions. In an effort to educate our customers on how to better protect themselves, we have listed the major enemies in our war on helping your breathe easier.

Molds and Other Allergens

Molds and other allergens can arise from a host of means, but there are two common classes: (a) moisture induced growth of mold colonies and (b) natural substances released into the air such as animal dander and plant pollen. Moisture buildup inside buildings may arise from water penetrating compromised areas of the building envelope or skin, from plumbing leaks, from condensation due to improper ventilation, or from ground moisture penetrating a building part. In areas where cellulosic materials (paper and wood, including drywall) become moist and fail to dry within 48 hours, mold mildew can propagate and release allergenic spores into the air. More serious than most allergenic properties is the ability of mold to trigger episodes in persons that already have asthma, a serious respiratory disease. Learn more about these by Clicking Here.

Carbon Monoxide

Carbon Monoxide is one of the most acutely toxic indoor air contaminants, which is a colorless, odorless gas that is a byproduct of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Common sources of carbon monoxide are tobacco smoke, space heaters using fossil fuels, defective central heating furnaces and automobile exhaust. Improvements in indoor levels of CO are systematically improving from increasing numbers of smoke-free restaurants and other legislated non-smoking buildings. By depriving the brain of oxygen, high levels of carbon monoxide can lead to nausea, unconsciousness and death. According to the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), the time-weighted average (TWA) limit for carbon monoxide (630-08-0) is 25 ppm[vague]. Learn more about this by Clicking Here

Volatile Organic Compounds

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted as gases from certain solids or liquids. VOCs include a variety of chemicals, some of which may have short- and long-term adverse health effects. Concentrations of many VOCs are consistently higher indoors (up to ten times higher) than outdoors. VOCs are emitted by a wide array of products numbering in the thousands. Examples include: paints and lacquers, paint strippers, cleaning supplies, pesticides, building materials and furnishings, office equipment such as copiers and printers, correction fluids and carbonless copy paper, graphics and craft materials including glues and adhesives, permanent markers, and photographic solutions. All of these products can release organic compounds during usage, and, to some degree, when they are stored. Learn more about these by Clicking Here

Legionella

Legionnaire’s Disease is caused by a waterborne bacterium Legionella that grows best in slow-moving or still, warm water. The primary route of exposure is aerosolization, most commonly from evaporative cooling towers or showerheads. A common cause in commercial buildings is due to poorly placed or maintained evaporative cooling towers, which often release aerosolized water that may enter nearby ventilation intakes. Outbreaks in medical facilities and nursing homes, where patients are immuno-suppressed and immuno-weak, are the most commonly reported cases of Legionellosis. More than one case has involved outdoor fountains in public attractions. The presence of Legionella in commercial building water supplies is highly under-reported, as healthy people require heavy exposure to acquire infection.Learn more about this by Clicking Here

Asbestos Fibers

The U.S. Federal Government (www.osha.gov) and some States have set standards for acceptable levels of asbestos fibers in indoor air. Many common building materials used before 1975 contain asbestos, such as some floor tiles, ceiling tiles, taping muds, pipe wrap, mastics and other insulation materials. Normally significant releases of asbestos fiber do not occur unless the building materials are disturbed, such as by cutting, sanding, drilling or building remodeling. Inhalation of asbestos fibers over long exposure times is associated with increased incidence of lung cancer. When asbestos-containing material is damaged or disintegrates, microscopic fibers are dispersed into the air. The symptoms of the disease do not usually appear until about 20 to 30 years after the first exposure to asbestos. Learn more about these by Clicking Here

Carbon Dioxide

Carbon dioxide (CO2) at levels that are unusually high indoors may cause occupants to grow drowsy, get headaches, or function at lower activity levels. Humans are the main indoor source of carbon dioxide. To eliminate most Indoor Air Quality complaints, total indoor carbon dioxide should be reduced a difference of less than 600 ppm above outdoor levels. Indoor air concentrations of carbon dioxide that exceed 1,000 ppm are considered a marker suggesting inadequate ventilation. It is recommended that carbon dioxide levels not exceed 700 ppm above outdoor ambient levels. OSHA limits carbon dioxide concentration in the workplace to 5,000 ppm for prolonged periods, and 35,000 ppm for 15 minutes. A common cause of excess CO2 are leaks in metal exhaust pipes.Learn more about this by Clicking Here

Ozone

Ozone is produced by ultraviolet light from the Sun hitting the Earth’s atmosphere, lightning, certain electric devices (i.e. air ionisers), and as a byproduct of other types of pollution. Ozone exists in greater concentrations at altitudes commonly flown by passenger jets. Ozone itself is also irritating to lung tissue and harmful to human health. Larger jets have ozone filters to reduce the cabin concentration to safer levels. Outdoor air used for ventilation may have sufficient ozone to react with common indoor pollutants as well as skin oils and other common indoor air chemicals or surfaces. Particular concern is warranted when using “green” cleaning products based on citrus or terpene extracts as these chemicals react very quickly with ozone to form toxic and irritating chemicals as well as fine and ultrafine particles. Learn more about this by Clicking Here

INFORMATION BYTES